Science of learning

Key research

 

At Spark Academy, we are passionate about understanding new research and developments in the world of education. One area that is coming to the forefront is known as the ‘Science of learning.’

Science of learning is a relatively new field of research. It brings together research from neuroscience, psychology, education and other research disciplines to bridge the gap. During my time as a teacher, I have seen many new initiatives become implemented into teaching practice. That is until the next new thing come along and usurps the previous model of teaching.

However many of these initiatives were based on neuromyths. For example, it was thought that individuals learn better when they receive information in their preferred learning style (visual, auditory, kinesthetic). Yet there were never any clear implications for pedagogy arising from existing models of learning styles.

 

The Spark approach

 

The new field of research is mainly concerned with looking at how our brains work. From this, we can develop teaching methods that maximise learning by using this knowledge. The brain is multi-sensory so learning benefits from a multiple sensory delivery. How many times have you heard a song that reminds you of a specific event from your past? Or a certain scent takes you back to a happy memory?

 

Is it possible to maximise learning by engaging all of our senses?

 

One idea that we are going to be investigating is having a specific ‘Spark’ scent. This will be used in classrooms to help invigorate student brains and hopefully allow more links to be made during their learning journey.

One statement that is reiterated a lot throughout this research, is that our brains are plastic. We are responsible for allowing our brains to grow and therefore store information. This includes reading a book that isn’t on the English syllabus or visiting a museum that holds an array of historic artefacts.  It is common practice in education to give students labels, however what the research is showing is that the brain can still develop to store the information required, it may just be at a slower rate. What it also shows is that these labels can restrict the learning of the students who have been labelled, for example, with dyslexia. They become dependent on their label as a reason for not achieving something and yet their brains are just as plastic as the next student.

Our mission at Spark Academy is to develop young people that are resilient and independent learners. We will continue to research the workings of the brain and implement changes to our teaching. These new strategies will see us help students to think for themselves, not be afraid to make mistakes but learn from them and in short, be the best version of themselves they can be.